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20131028
20131105
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
and around the world. we have great show for you today. we'll start with nsa spying and uproar it caused in europe especially. germany's former defense minister will explain what is going on there. and then the former nsa director will help us understand what america's spies are really doing around the world and michael bloomberg called the mayor of the world. with the election of his successor on hand, what lessons does bloomberg have to share with us? one of them, cities need rich people. he'll explain. and the latest weapon against bad guys. it's not a new fangled drone or bunker buster bomb. it's simply brittany. i'll explain. revelations about the national security agency and spying on foreign allied leaders has been embarrassing for the obama administration at a time when it hardly needs more bad news. is it more than an embarrassment? should it raise alarms abroad and at home? at first glance this is a story that is less about ethics and more about power. the great power gap between the united states and other countries even rich european ones. the most illuminating response came
the "wall street journal report"ed he did learn this summer the nsa was bugging phones of german chancellor angela merkel and other world leaders for nearly five years. followed by a few claims of hhs sebelius obama didn't know about problems of the health care website before the launch. the white house frequently has given a variation on this theme. the question, what did obama know and when did he know it? answer not much and about a minute ago. i mean not much and about a minute ago. and so now we're hearing that from other people that he did know for five years that angela merkel and allies have been -- i mean this is bad. >> the length of time that the program has been under operation or at least the lent of time it has been published with various world leaders. if he did not know, if you choose to believe the president of the united states and i believe the president of the united states, i want to believe the president of the united states. >> some reports suggest he signed off on it. >> if he did not know why didn't he know? the larger question is do we have an out of control nation
-ed in "the l.a. times." you called for changes to be made to the nsa's massive phone data gathering program and say it's the evidence that it has made us safer is limited. instead it appears that the utility of the metadata program has been conflated with the success of other collection efforts. how do you determine how much surveillance, then, is too much? >> i think we have to weigh what is the size of the program, what is the magnitude of the collection and what are the results it's getting? and even more than that, even if it met that test, even if the metadata program was very successful, we also have to ask, is it necessary to collect all this data or can the program be restructured? in my view, the program can be restructured in a way that has the telecommunications providers retain their own data. i doesn't require the government to get all that data. when we suspect that a phone number is connected to a plot, then we go to the phone company, much as we would do in a criminal investigation. so i think we can get the same information we need. we can continue to protect the country. w
that nsa leaker edward snowden could be granted clemency. i want to bring in benjamin carden. senator carden, glad to have you here, sir. >> alex, good to be with you. >> edward snowden released what he called this manifesto for the truth. he says current debates about spying just prove his revelations are helping bring about change. what's your response to that? >> mr. snowden has caused real damage to this country. the manner in which he has conducted these releases have compromised our national security. as senator feinstein said, there's a way in which a whistleblower can get information to us. we want to make sure there's adequate oversight on the powers of the intelligence community. we need the right balance to keep us safe and protect the rights of americans. so there's concern on how we collect data, but for a person who has been given that access and trust on his own to do this type of release is detrimental to our country. >> sir, as you serve on the senate foreign relations committee, i know you're privy to things we are not necessarily. do you believe what we know so far
have a big place outs dchq, which is a huge listening -- like your nsa, a huge listening -- i'm assuming, as i pay my taxes, that they're listening to everybody. >> yes, i hope so. and who is that lady that -- >> what they're not doing, i'm assuming, is taking notes. i think where we went wrong with the u.s. administration, joe, they wrote it down that they were listen to go angela merkel. >> that's what happens. who's that lady that tells daniel craig what to do? >> m. >> she knows, right? >> yes. i'm just trying to get this straight. the germans, they're rich. the germany at this point is -- it reminds me of cas casablanca. germany has not earned its spying outrage with all of their arms dealings and all the -- anyway, we get involved in everything over here, ross. >> there was a report yesterday, annette talked about it out of frankfurt. there was one report in the german press that said it may -- because of hangovers from the laws post the war, it may not be illegal for the u.s. to spy on the -- to listen in on the german fwoft. so there is some debate about whether the u.
if they will be charged. the cause is still under investigation. nsa leaker edward snowden has a message for the u.s. stop treating me like a trader. -- traitor. snowden is under temporary asylum in russia for leaking the nsa's secret playbook and faces espionage charges in the u.s. tucker. >> hey, clayton what needs to be done to prevent these kind of attacks. jonathan gillian. thank you for joining thus morning. >> good to be with you. >> i want to put up on the scene -- screen. there have been couple of shootings. gunman killed himself in houston. 2010, new orleans, one dead, one wounded and famously in los angeles 2002, two dead and three wounded. do you see a pattern here? >> well, obviously we see a pattern of individuals that are drawn to this for some reason. i'm not exactly clear why people who have rage are drawn to this. but, yeah, we definitely do see an issue with this. and i think probably one of the things that allows people to go there and do or draws them there is the access to the airport. and the importance of the airport. so they probably look at this as something that almost like a go
that this is connected in a way of the mourdock family in ways that we didn't appreciate. >> connected to the nsa? is this about phone hacking? >> this is about phone hacking. >> we know and don't say anything. >> whether this touches the mourdock family, does rebekah brooks try to rat out the family? i don't think so. becky, in the u.k. do they change the laws around the press? there's been some talk about trying to beef up the laws. some things that would protect the press in good ways but other things that would make it much more difficult. >> are we tamer here than mourdock's tabloids? >> yes. >> we are until we know otherwise but i think we are. >> this couldn't have been more ridiculous. >> that's? >> the new york snoes. >> geno's interceptions cause -- >> the post, you love it? >> they're one step above blogging. >> it's an early read every morning. >> fiction. >> that's fine too. >> when we come back, we're going to take a look at the markets and this week's fed meeting. first, a very happy birthday to bill gates. the microsoft founder turns 58 today. ♪ ♪ (vo) you are a business pro.
on how much they trust their technology. all of the nsa scandals, obviously the real intrusion of social media in our everyday lives. you can't go out to dinner without someone having their phone placed next to their fork and knife. >> taking a picture of the food, which i do. >> young people know what we want, when we want it. if we don't want people prying in and having 1,000 facebook alerts on our phone, we're going to shut it off. i think people are becoming aware and regulating their facebook use. >> kathryn, i think it was you who made a note in our producer talking notes as they say, people tend to when they look at what their friends are doing, they really can't help themselves to comment. they can't help themselves to comment. we whine about our boyfriends. we are asking for commentary on that. you take it to the facebook level. >> jessica posted this. >> yeah, i think that could be maybe what's causing the stress in the relationships. maybe not having the mutual friends but maybe posting all of the things on the internet. that can obviously affect things. >> social media height
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)

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